Certification

  • 25 Jan 2018 9:29 AM
    Reply # 5701559 on 5674934
    Anonymous

    I know the BSN issue doesn't affect me personally or those applying for School Nurse II who were hired prior to July 1, 2016. My disagreement  with RSA 200:29 is that those hired after July 1, 2016 must pursue a BSN over 6 years according to the School Nurse I certification requirement.  I think all school nurses currently working, regardless of their hire date, should be grandfathered in and the BSN requirement should only apply to FUTURE new hires in 2019.

  • 25 Jan 2018 8:22 AM
    Reply # 5701464 on 5674934
    Anonymous
    Debra Spencer wrote:

    I have read the responses.  I understand most of the concerns.  I have been a nurse since 1979 starting out as a LPN & graduating to a ASN.  Unfortunately, back in those days, a BSN was only offered at a 4 yr university, unattainable for many of us way back in the day.  Even up to the present, nurses basically have 2 choices, doing hands on care or management. The majority of hospitals do not pay for the extra degrees that nurses carry if you choose not to go the management route.  At least today, the BSN route has many more affordable options/plans for those who wish to go that route. There are still many of us that choose to do hands on care.  Does that mean we are unable to show leadership skills or critical thinking throughout the day?  Who is it that runs the floor during the days when management is gone (most of the day at meetings), nights & weekends when staffing is at a bare minimum?  It is A nurse.  No one asks whether you have a ASN or BSN when a patient's heart stops, or when a surgical wound dehiscence or worse an evisceration occurs?  It is the floor nurse that sits with the patient who takes their last breath when no family is around. It is the floor nurse who tries to help the family cope & understand what is happening to their loved one when the MD or nursing management has gone home for the day.

    Don't misunderstand me, I too am all for furthering education.  Hospitals have great incentives & financial assistance for furthering nurses education, school systems do not.  I have been a nurse going on 39 yrs.  I have a ASN degree.  To say that in all this time I have not learned leadership & critical thinking skills only because I do not have a BSN is absolutely absurd.  Life skills add a lot to this equation.  I'm 58.7 yrs old, have raised a child, &  have experienced more in my lifetime than many new graduates of BSN programs coming into the workforce. But because they are cheaper (as a new grad for the school systems, never mind the experience needed) guess who is chosen?

    I am currently in school but for me now at this stage of the game to obtain a BSN would not further my education, but I do want to learn something that will help me work with the children I am in charge of.  I do want to be certified in School Nursing.  The NSNA does accept a BS in Psychology to sit for the national exam.  So, for me, this is my goal.

    I would hope that long before legislation is introduced, those forming the law(s) actually speak to school nurses in the field & learn what we do.  I would be more than happy to explain the difference in assessment & care for children with chronic medical needs such as asthma, diabetes & melt downs as seen through the eyes of a nurse vs that of a medic.  By law, the medic is not licensed to make those independent decisions as a RN is.  Will it be the medic who teaches school teachers how to give injections of glucagon or epinephrine in an emergency? Again, their license does not cover them in this area.  Now you are going to have to introduce new laws to cover the medic in these situations or look at Lawsuit City & what about the DOE. Oh, no one has mentioned them yet.  Are our legislators aware that the School nurse, who is ultimately bound by the state laws of the Board of Nursing in NH, also somehow has to juggle the requirements of the DOE in the care of the children under our charge?  

    I say all of this because there is more than just throwing together a bunch of words to form a law to mandate this or that.  With the vast number of nurses in the field today, crossing different ideas, fields of education & experiences, one law without allowing for other avenues to obtain degrees, or other degrees that augment to the nurses degree (ex: ASN), the state of NH will lose many qualified nurses, only because of a technicality.    

    Debra Spencer, RN

    Bluff Elementary School  SAU # 6

    10 Summit Rd

    Claremont, NH  03743

     " have a ASN degree.  To say that in all this time I have not learned leadership & critical thinking skills only because I do not have a BSN is absolutely absurd"

    The rules agree with you Debra.  School nurse 2 recognizes that nurses currently employed should not need to further their education.   I have 23 years in School Nursing without the BSN and thankfully, this legislation does not require me to go back to school.      

    My fear is that in 20 years, when the next nurse in my position is contemplating his/her retirement, that they don't look back on their career and think  "Why didn't the school system value me enough to give me teacher pay and benefits."  

    There is so much to talk about here, lets keep the discussion going.

     



  • 25 Jan 2018 8:15 AM
    Reply # 5701459 on 5699803
    Anonymous
    Ellen Bald wrote:

    I am so torn because I do believe in a future  BSN requirement for entry to practice, but I am opposed to DOE certification.  I do understand the pay equity issue some nurses face in some districts as a rationale for a Bachelor's degree. However, I think all currently serving school nurses should not be required to have or get a BSN, instead be given credit for years of clinical nursing experience. I don't have a problem with a BSN as a future requirement.  I have an MSN, but to all nurses with many years of clinical experience I am honored to serve with you regardless of your educational preparation; you are my people.

    As for certification, I am opposed and I agree with others in this forum who think that the DOE should have no jurisdiction on clinical nursing practice, and I agree that certification is merely a revenue-generating tactic for the state.  Ultimately my allegiance is to the the Board of Nursing and my nursing license, not the DOE. I can change employers, but my license is my livelihood. Adding yet another layer of documentation and paperwork that has NO correlation to my clinical competence or nursing license is ridiculous. I worked as a school nurse in Vermont where VT DOE also requires school nurses to be certified. It cost me $375 to renew a 5-year Vermont certification which was nothing more than hours and hours of submitting proof of professional development (which we already are required to do for licensure), and other documents that had nothing to do with school nursing practice. In return I got a piece of paper that meant nothing; it didn't get me a pay raise, or raise my professionalism somehow. I resent the additional requirement and the underlying belief by DOE that our nursing license is somehow inadequate as a credential for school employment or classroom teaching. All nurses teach students every day in the school nurses office in addition to providing care. DOE certification does not prove that I am a better qualified nurse, teacher or employee.

    I'd like to point out that the current rules as written do not require a BSN of you   It is written to address new hires only.  All nurses already employed as a school nurse before July 1st, 2016 automatically qualify  as a "School Nurse 2"

    The person at the DOE who moved this legislation forward was our former Commissioner, Virginia Barry.  She was and is a staunch supporter of school nurses and advocates for them being recognized as a vital part of the school community.  I feel pretty confident in saying that she never felt that the BON license is inadequate.  She has great respect for what we do, and wants the school community to embrace us as essential.  

    Lets please continue this discussion,  there are Pros and Cons to each side.



  • 25 Jan 2018 7:58 AM
    Reply # 5701351 on 5700424
    Anonymous
    Ian Riddell wrote:

    Does anyone know if certification has been killed with the new legislation?  

    As of this writing we are still waiting to hear if the education committee is going to move it forward or not to the house.

    It is in the hands of the education committee to decide if it moves forward.

  • 24 Jan 2018 2:16 PM
    Reply # 5700424 on 5674934
    Anonymous

    Does anyone know if certification has been killed with the new legislation?  

  • 24 Jan 2018 9:49 AM
    Reply # 5699803 on 5674934
    Anonymous

    I am so torn because I do believe in a future  BSN requirement for entry to practice, but I am opposed to DOE certification.  I do understand the pay equity issue some nurses face in some districts as a rationale for a Bachelor's degree. However, I think all currently serving school nurses should not be required to have or get a BSN, instead be given credit for years of clinical nursing experience. I don't have a problem with a BSN as a future requirement.  I have an MSN, but to all nurses with many years of clinical experience I am honored to serve with you regardless of your educational preparation; you are my people.

    As for certification, I am opposed and I agree with others in this forum who think that the DOE should have no jurisdiction on clinical nursing practice, and I agree that certification is merely a revenue-generating tactic for the state.  Ultimately my allegiance is to the the Board of Nursing and my nursing license, not the DOE. I can change employers, but my license is my livelihood. Adding yet another layer of documentation and paperwork that has NO correlation to my clinical competence or nursing license is ridiculous. I worked as a school nurse in Vermont where VT DOE also requires school nurses to be certified. It cost me $375 to renew a 5-year Vermont certification which was nothing more than hours and hours of submitting proof of professional development (which we already are required to do for licensure), and other documents that had nothing to do with school nursing practice. In return I got a piece of paper that meant nothing; it didn't get me a pay raise, or raise my professionalism somehow. I resent the additional requirement and the underlying belief by DOE that our nursing license is somehow inadequate as a credential for school employment or classroom teaching. All nurses teach students every day in the school nurses office in addition to providing care. DOE certification does not prove that I am a better qualified nurse, teacher or employee.

  • 10 Jan 2018 12:22 PM
    Message # 5674934
    Anonymous

    I have read the responses.  I understand most of the concerns.  I have been a nurse since 1979 starting out as a LPN & graduating to a ASN.  Unfortunately, back in those days, a BSN was only offered at a 4 yr university, unattainable for many of us way back in the day.  Even up to the present, nurses basically have 2 choices, doing hands on care or management. The majority of hospitals do not pay for the extra degrees that nurses carry if you choose not to go the management route.  At least today, the BSN route has many more affordable options/plans for those who wish to go that route. There are still many of us that choose to do hands on care.  Does that mean we are unable to show leadership skills or critical thinking throughout the day?  Who is it that runs the floor during the days when management is gone (most of the day at meetings), nights & weekends when staffing is at a bare minimum?  It is A nurse.  No one asks whether you have a ASN or BSN when a patient's heart stops, or when a surgical wound dehiscence or worse an evisceration occurs?  It is the floor nurse that sits with the patient who takes their last breath when no family is around. It is the floor nurse who tries to help the family cope & understand what is happening to their loved one when the MD or nursing management has gone home for the day.

    Don't misunderstand me, I too am all for furthering education.  Hospitals have great incentives & financial assistance for furthering nurses education, school systems do not.  I have been a nurse going on 39 yrs.  I have a ASN degree.  To say that in all this time I have not learned leadership & critical thinking skills only because I do not have a BSN is absolutely absurd.  Life skills add a lot to this equation.  I'm 58.7 yrs old, have raised a child, &  have experienced more in my lifetime than many new graduates of BSN programs coming into the workforce. But because they are cheaper (as a new grad for the school systems, never mind the experience needed) guess who is chosen?

    I am currently in school but for me now at this stage of the game to obtain a BSN would not further my education, but I do want to learn something that will help me work with the children I am in charge of.  I do want to be certified in School Nursing.  The NSNA does accept a BS in Psychology to sit for the national exam.  So, for me, this is my goal.

    I would hope that long before legislation is introduced, those forming the law(s) actually speak to school nurses in the field & learn what we do.  I would be more than happy to explain the difference in assessment & care for children with chronic medical needs such as asthma, diabetes & melt downs as seen through the eyes of a nurse vs that of a medic.  By law, the medic is not licensed to make those independent decisions as a RN is.  Will it be the medic who teaches school teachers how to give injections of glucagon or epinephrine in an emergency? Again, their license does not cover them in this area.  Now you are going to have to introduce new laws to cover the medic in these situations or look at Lawsuit City & what about the DOE. Oh, no one has mentioned them yet.  Are our legislators aware that the School nurse, who is ultimately bound by the state laws of the Board of Nursing in NH, also somehow has to juggle the requirements of the DOE in the care of the children under our charge?  

    I say all of this because there is more than just throwing together a bunch of words to form a law to mandate this or that.  With the vast number of nurses in the field today, crossing different ideas, fields of education & experiences, one law without allowing for other avenues to obtain degrees, or other degrees that augment to the nurses degree (ex: ASN), the state of NH will lose many qualified nurses, only because of a technicality.    

    Debra Spencer, RN

    Bluff Elementary School  SAU # 6

    10 Summit Rd

    Claremont, NH  03743

     

     


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